Marketplace

See all articles

US salmon buying flattens as prices increase

However, imported volume is steady so consumers are not buying a lot more than last year.

Salmon imports into the United States are becoming more expensive. Volume increased by only 2 percent through August, but jumped 22 percent in cost compared to last year, according to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

The United States imported 197,161 metric tons of Atlantic salmon worth $2.12 billion (€1.8 billion).

The largest category, fresh farmed salmon fillets, saw a 4 percent drop in volume to 86,606 metric tons, but an 18 percent jump in value to $1.1 billion (€935 million). Here's a look at the top three exporting countries in this category:

  • Chile: 62,190 metric tons worth $746.8 million (€634.8 million), a 4 percent drop in volume, but 19 percent increase in value.
  • Norway: 12,616 metric tons worth $154.7 million (€131.5 million), a 5 percent drop in volume, but 16 percent increase in value.
  • Canada: 5,076 metric tons worth $66.4 million (€56.4 million), a 7 percent drop in volume, but 14 percent increase in value.

The United States imported 78,820 metric tons of fresh farmed whole salmon worth $638 million (€542.3 million), a 6 percent and 15 percent increase in volume and value, respectively, year-on-year.

More than half came from Canada: 47,697 metric tons worth $377.9 million (€321.2 million), a 12 percent and 2 percent drop in volume and value, respectively.

Through August, US imports of frozen fillets came to 28,713 metric tons worth $407.2 million (€346.1 million), a 21 percent and 59 percent increase in volume and value, respectively.

---

For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.