Marketplace

See all articles

US H1 seafood imports up, but tilapia, pangasius hit hard

Tilapia and pangasius imports shrink though.

The United States imported 4 percent more seafood in the first half of 2017 compared with the same period a year previously, spending nearly 11 percent more during the six months, according to the latest figures from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

In total, the country imported 1.4 million metric tons worth $10.4 billion (€8.9 billion) in the six months through June. This compares to 1.35 million metric tons worth $9.4 billion (€8 billion) in the same period a year ago.

Of the total, shrimp, as usual, was the largest import species for the United States. The country imported a grand total – both warmwater and coldwater in various product forms – of 286,769 metric tons worth $2.7 billion (€2.3 billion). This is up 8.5 percent and 12.5 percent, respectively, compared with the 264,382 metric tons of shrimp worth $2.4 billion (€2 billion) imported in the first six months of 2016.

Another big import species for the United States is Atlantic salmon; the country imported 148,029 metric tons worth $1.6 billion (€1.4 billion) in the first six months of 2017, which although flat in terms of volume is up in value from the 148,292 metric tons worth $1.3 billion (€1.1 billion) in the same period a year earlier.

Tilapia and pangasius are also big import species for the United States. However, in the first half of 2017 imports of these species sank both in volume and value.

The country imported 88,849 metric tons of tilapia, for example, worth $337.3 million (€287.1 million) in the six months through June, compared with 101,553 metric tons worth $408.9 million (€348 million) in the same period of 2016.

Likewise pangasius imports also dropped in the first half of this year, falling to 56,044 metric tons worth $182.1 million (€155 million), down from 68,309 metric tons worth $206 million (€175.3 million) in 2016.

---

For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.